The 75th Ranger Regiment – a general history

THE 75TH RANGER REGIMENT

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Companies A and B, 75th Infantry (Ranger) had remained on duty in the United States Army. In 1974, the 1st and 2nd Battalion (Ranger), 75th Infantry, which gave the Army a stronger capability in Ranger operations, replaced them.

In 1984, the 3rd Battalion was also organized. All three battalions were then placed under the command of a new Ranger headquarters, the 75th Infantry (Ranger) Regiment. Ranger battalions conducted combat parachute assaults on Grenada (1983) and Panama (1989), as well as combat operations during Operation Eagle Claw, Desert Storm, Haiti and Somalia. The 75th Infantry (Ranger) Regiment was redesignated the 75th Ranger Regiment in 1986.

Today, the men of the 75th Ranger Regiment are tasked with the responsibility for missions similar to those that were undertaken by their forebears during the past three and a half centuries. Ranger weapons and means of transportation have changed considerably; however, the basic nature of their operations remains the same. If an experienced Ranger from one of Robert Rogers’ companies returned and joined a modern Ranger company, he would probably feel right at home after a few weapons classes. However, it might take a while before he would grow accustomed to parachute and helicopter assaults.

The outbreak of the 1973 Middle East War prompted the Department of the Army to be concerned about the need for a light mobile force that could be moved quickly to any trouble spot in the world. In the fall of 1973, General Creighton Abrams, Army Chief of Staff, formulated the idea of the reformation of the first battalion-sized Ranger units since World War II.

In January 1974, he sent a message to the field directing formation of a Ranger battalion. He selected its missions and picked the first officers. He felt a tough, disciplined and elite Ranger unit would set a standard for the rest of the United States Army and that, as Rangers graduated from Ranger units to Regular Army units, their influence would improve the entire Army. Following are some of General Abrams’ comments (which became known as “Abrams Charter”) on the Rangers which, in their early days, were often referred to as “Abe’s Own.”

The Ranger Battalion is to be an elite, light, and the most proficient infantry battalion in the world; a battalion that can do things with its hands and weapons better than anyone. The Battalion will contain no hoodlums or brigands and that if the battalion were formed of such, it should be disbanded.

The organization of the Battalion must be done right, there (is) no timetable for this effort, (that) it must be determined first what has to be done and with what equipment and facilities. Wherever the Ranger Battalion goes, it is apparent that it is the best.

On January 25, 1974, Headquarters, United States Army Forces Command, published General Orders 127, directing the activation of the 1st Battalion (Ranger), 75th Infantry, with an effective date of January 31, 1974. In February, the worldwide selection was begun and personnel assembled at Fort Benning, Georgia, to undergo the cadre training from March through June 1974. On July 1, 1974, the 1st Battalion (Ranger), 75th Infantry, parachuted into Fort Stewart, Georgia. The 2nd Battalion (Ranger), 75th Infantry soon followed with activation on October 1, 1974. These elite units eventually established headquarters at Hunter Army Airfield, Georgia, and Fort Lewis, Washington, respectively.

As a result of the demonstrated effectiveness of the Ranger battalions during URGENT FURY, the Department of the Army announced in 1984 that it was increasing the size of the active duty Ranger force to its highest level in forty years, by activating another Ranger battalion and a Ranger regimental headquarters. These new units, the 3rd Battalion, 75th Infantry (Ranger), and Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 75th Infantry (Ranger), received their colors on October 3, 1984, at Fort Benning, Georgia.

The activation ceremonies were a step into the future for the Ranger Regiment, and a link to the past, as they were held concurrently with the first reunion of the Korean War-era Rangers. Distinguished visitors and proud Rangers, both active duty and retired, joined to hail the historic activation of the Headquarters, 75th Infantry Regiment (Ranger).

On February 3, 1986, World War II Battalions and Korean War Lineage and Honors were consolidated and assigned by tradition to the 75th Infantry Regiment. This marked the first time that an organization of that size had been officially recognized as the parent headquarters of the Ranger Battalions.

Not since World War II and Colonel Darby’s Ranger Force Headquarters, had the U.S. Army had such a large Ranger force, with over 2,000 soldiers being assigned to Ranger units.

The entire Ranger Regiment participated in OPERATION JUST CAUSE, in which U.S. forces restored democracy to Panama. Rangers spearheaded the action by conducting two important operations. The 1st Battalion, reinforced by Company C, 3rd Battalion, and a Regimental command and control team, conducted an early morning parachute assault onto Omar Torrijos International Airport and Tocumen Military Airfield, to neutralize the Panamanian Defense Forces’ (PDF) 2nd Rifle Company, the entire Panamanian Air Force and secure the airfields for the arrival of the 82nd Airborne Division.

The 2nd and 3rd (-) Ranger Battalions, and a Regimental command and control team, conducted a parachute assault onto the airfield at Rio Hato, to neutralize PDF 6th and 7th Rifle Companies and seize General Manuel Noriega’s beach house. Following the successful completion of these assaults, Rangers conducted follow-on operations in support of Joint Task Force (JTF)-South. The Rangers captured 1,014 Enemy Prisoners of War (EPW), and over 18,000 arms of various types. The Rangers sustained 5 killed and 42 wounded.

Elements of Company B and 1st Platoon Company A, 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment deployed to Saudi Arabia from February 12, 1991 to April 15, 1991, in support of OPERATION DESERT STORM. The Rangers conducted raids and provided a quick reaction force in cooperation with Allied forces; there were no Ranger casualties. The performance of these Rangers significantly contributed to the overall success of the operation, and upheld the proud traditions of the past.

From August 26, 1993, to 21 October, 1993, Company B, a Platoon from A Company and a command and control element of 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, deployed to Somalia to assist United Nations forces in bringing order to a desperately chaotic and starving nation.

 

RANGER UNITS

WORLD WAR II TO PRESENT

75th Infantry Regiment (5307th Composite Unit (Provisional)), U.S. Regular Army, 1943-1945

Ranger Infantry Battalions (6 Companies each), U.S. Regular Army, 1942-1945

1st Ranger Infantry Battalion (Darby), 1942-1944

2nd Ranger Infantry Battalion (Rudder), 1943-1945

3rd Ranger Infantry Battalion (Dammer), 1943-1944

4th Ranger Infantry Battalion (Murray), 1943-1944

5th Ranger Infantry Battalion (Schneider), 1943-1945

6th Ranger Infantry Battalion (Mucci), 1944-1945

29th Infantry Ranger Battalion (Provisional Battalion of Infantry Division), U.S. Regular Army, 1943

Ranger Squads (Provisional Units formed by Fifth Army and by some Divisions in Europe), U.S. Regular Army, 1944-1945

8213 ASU (8th Army Regular Company) (A Provisional Unit), U.S. Regular Army, 1950

Ranger Training Center (Airborne), Ranger Training Command, U.S. Regular Army, 1950-1951.

Ranger Infantry Companies (Airborne), (Independent Companies attached to Divisions), U.S. Regular Army, 1950-1951

1st Ranger Infantry Company (Abn) (2nd IN Div), 1950-1951

2nd Ranger Infantry Company (Abn) (7th IN Div), 1950-1951

3rd Ranger Infantry Company (Abn) (3rd IN Div), 1950-1951

4th Ranger Infantry Company (Abn) (1st CAV Div), 1950-1951

5th Ranger Infantry Company (Abn) (25th IN Div), 1950-1951

6th Ranger Infantry Company (Abn) (1st IN Div), 1950-1951

7th Ranger Infantry Company (Abn) (Rgr Tng Cmd), 1950-1951

8th Ranger Infantry Company (Abn) (24th IN Div), 1950-1951

9th Ranger Infantry Company (Abn) (31st IN Div), 1951

10th Ranger Infantry Company (Abn) (45th IN Div), 1951

11th Ranger Infantry Company (Abn) (40th IN Div), 1951

12th Ranger Infantry Company (Abn) (28th IN Div), 1951

13th Ranger Infantry Company (Abn) (43rd IN Div), 1951

14th Ranger Infantry Company (Abn) (4th IN Div), 1951

15th Ranger Infantry Company (Abn) (47th IN Div), 1951

Ranger Infantry Company A (Abn) Ranger Training Command, 1951

Ranger Infantry Company B (Abn) Ranger Training Command, 1951

Ranger Department, U.S. Army Infantry School, U.S. Regular Army, 1952-Present

75th Infantry (Ranger) Regiment (Independent Companies attached to Divisions and Corps), U.S. Regular Army, 1969-1974

A Co, 75th Infantry (Ranger) (197th IN Bde and V Corps), 1969-1974

B Co, 75th Infantry (Ranger) (VII Corps), 1969-1974

C Co, 75th Infantry (Ranger) (I Field Force), 1969-1971

D Co, 75th Infantry (Ranger) (II Field Force), 1969-1971

E Co, 75th Infantry (Ranger) (9th IN Div), 1969-1970

F Co, 75th Infantry (Ranger) (25th IN Div), 1969-1971

G Co, 75th Infantry (Ranger) (23rd IN Div), 1969-1971

H Co, 75th Infantry (Ranger) (1st CAV Div), 1969

I Co, 75th Infantry (Ranger) (1st IN Div), 1969-1970

K Co, 75th Infantry (Ranger) (4th IN Div), 1969-1970

L Co, 75th Infantry (Ranger) (101st ABN Div), 1969-1971

M Co, 75th Infantry (Ranger) (199th IN Bde), 1969-1970

N Co, 75th Infantry (Ranger) (173rd ABN Bde), 1969-1971

O Co, 75th Infantry (Ranger) (US Army-Alaska), 1967-1969 (82nd ABN Div), 1969

P Co, 75th Infantry (Ranger) (5th IN Div), 1969-1971

D Co, 151st Infantry (Ranger), 1970

Airborne Ranger Companies (Army National Guard), 1981

D Co, 151st Infantry (Ranger), Indiana

E Co, 65th Infantry (Ranger), Puerto Rico

F Co, 425th Infantry (Ranger), Michigan

G Co, 143rd Infantry (Ranger), Texas

H Co, 175th Infantry (Ranger), Maryland

The Modern Rangers, 1974 – Present

75th Infantry (Ranger) Regiment (Headquarters Company and Three Battalions of Three Line Companies each), U.S. Regular Army. Provisionally designated on 1 July 1984. Formally designated 3 October 1984-2 February 1986.

75th Ranger Regiment, 3 February 1986 to present.

1st Battalion (Ranger), 75th Infantry, 31 January 1974 – 2 February 1986.

1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, 3 February 1986 – Present.

2nd Battalion (Ranger), 75th Infantry, 1 October 1974 – 2 February 1986.

2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, 3 February 1986 – Present.

3rd Battalion (Ranger), 75th Infantry, 2 October 1984 – 2 February 1986.

3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, 3 February 1986 – Present.

Organization and Equipment Introduction of the Ranger Regiment

Figure A-1. Ranger regiment.

Figure A-2. Ranger regimental HHC.

Figure A-3. Ranger regimental staff.

Figure A-4. Ranger regimental headquarters company.

Figure A-5. Ranger regimental communications platoon.

Figure A-6. Ranger regimental reconnaissance platoon.

Figure A-7. The ranger battalion.

Figure A-8. Ranger battalion HHC.

Figure A-9. Ranger rifle company.

Figure A-10. Ranger rifle platoon.

Figure A-11. Ranger weapons platoon.

75TH RANGER REGIMENT

Shoulder Sleeve Insignia

Distinctive Unit Insignia

Coat of Arms

Shoulder Sleeve Insignia. Description: A black cloth triparted arced scroll with narrow red fimbriations and a 1/8 inch (.32cm) black border 1 29/32 inches (4.84cm) in height and 3 11/16 inches (9.37cm) in width overall inscribed “75 RANGER RGT” in white letters.

Background: The shoulder sleeve insignia was originally approved for the 75th Infantry on 26 Jul 1984. It was redesignated on 14 Feb 1986 for the 75th Ranger Regiment. The shoulder sleeve insignia for the 1st, 2d and 3d Ranger Battalions were approved on 26 Jul 1984.

Distinctive Unit Insignia. Description: A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned as follows: Quarterly Azure (blue) and Vert (green), between in the first and fourth quarters a radiant sun of twelve points and a mullet Argent, a lightning flash couped bendsinisterwise Gules fimbriated Or.

Symbolism: The colors blue, white, red and green represent four of the original six combat teams of the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional), commonly referred to as Merrill’s Marauders, which were identified by color. To avoid confusion, the other two colors, khaki and orange, were not represented in the design, however, khaki was represented by the color of the uniform worn by US forces in the China-Burma-India Theater during World War II. The unit’s close cooperation with the Chinese forces in the China-Burma-India Theater is represented by the sun symbol from the Chinese flag. The white star represents the Star of Burma, the country in which the Marauders campaigned during World War II. The lightning bolt is symbolic of the strike characteristics of the Marauders’ behind-the-line activities.

Background: The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved on 18 Mar 1969 for the 75th Infantry. It was redesignated for the 75th Ranger Regiment on 3 Feb 1986.

Coat of Arms.

Blazon:

Shield: Quarterly Azure and Vert, between in the first and fourth quarters a radiant sun of twelve points and a mullet Argent, a lightning flash couped bendsinisterwise Gules fimbriated Or.

Crest: On a wreath of the colors Argent and Azure, issuing in back of an embattlement of a tower with six merlons Or a pedestal Gules supporting a chinthé affronté of the third in front of a torteau within an annulet of the Second.

Motto: SUA SPONTE (Of Their Own Accord).

Symbolism:

Shield: The colors blue, white, red and green represent four of the original six combat teams of the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional), commonly referred to as Merrill’s Marauders, which were identified by color. To avoid confusion, the other two colors, khaki and orange were not represented in the design; however, khaki was represented by the color of the uniform worn by US forces in the China-Burma-India Theater during World War II. The unit’s close cooperation with the Chinese forces in the China-Burma-India Theater is represented by the sun symbol from the Chinese flag. The white star represents the Star of Burma, the country in which the Marauders campaigned during World War II. The lightning bolt is symbolic of the strike characteristics of the Marauders’ behind-the-line activities.

Crest: The organization’s service in the China-Burma-India Theater of World War II is represented by the chinthé (a gold Burmese lion). The blue annulet symbolizes the Presidential Unit Citation awarded for service at Myitkyina, Burma, the “gateway to China.” The gold embattlement in base refers to the unit’s combat service in Vietnam while the six merlons represent six Valorous Unit Awards; the two Meritorious Unit Commendations earned by elements of the regiment are denoted by the scarlet disc at center.

Background: The coat of arms was originally approved for the 75th Infantry Regiment on 27 Jul 1954. It was amended to add a crest on 23 May 1974. On 3 Feb 1986 the coat of arms was redesignated for the 75th Ranger Regiment.

75th Ranger Regiment Lineage and Honors  (U.S. Army 1 July 2003)Organized 3 October 1943 in the Army of the United States in the China-Burma-India Theater of Operations as the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional)Consolidated 10 August 1944 with the 475th Infantry (constituted 25 May 1944 in the Army of the United States) and consolidated unit designated as the 475th InfantryInactivated 1 July 1945 in ChinaRedesignated 21 June 1954 as the 75th Infantry

Allotted 26 October 1954 to the Regular Army

Activated 20 November 1954 on Okinawa

Inactivated 21 March 1956 on Okinawa

Reorganized 1 January 1969 as a parent regiment under the Combat Arms Regimental System

Reorganized 1 July 1984 with Headquarters at Fort Benning, Georgia

Consolidated 3 February 1986 with the former 1st Ranger Infantry Battalion, 2d Infantry Battalion, and 3d, 4th, 5th, and 6th Ranger Infantry Battalions (see ANNEXES 1-6) and consolidated unit redesignated as the 75th Ranger Regiment; concurrently withdrawn from the Combat Arms Regimental System and reorganized under the United States Army Regimental System

ANNEX 1

Constituted 27 May 1942 in the Army of the United States as the 1st Ranger Battalion

Activated 19 June 1942 in Northern Ireland

Redesignated 1 August 1943 as the 1st Ranger Infantry Battalion

Disbanded 15 August 1944

Reconstituted 1 September 1948 in the Army of the United States as the 1st Infantry Battalion and activated in the Canal Zone

Inactivated 4 January 1950 in the Canal Zone

After 4 January 1950 organic elements underwent changes as follows:

Company A redesignated 25 October 1950 as the 1st Ranger Infantry Company and allotted to the Regular Army; activated 28 October 1950 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 1 August 1951 in Korea

Company B redesignated 2 November 1950 as the 5th Ranger Infantry Company and allotted to the Regular Army; activated 20 November 1950 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 1 August 1951 in Korea

Battalion redesignated 24 November 1952 as the 1st Ranger Infantry Battalion and allotted to the Regular Army (former organic elements concurrently redesignated)

Consolidated 15 April 1960 with the 1st Special Service Force (activated 9 July 1942), the 2d Infantry Battalion (see ANNEX 2), and the 3d, 4th, 5th, and 6th Ranger Infantry Battalions (see ANNEXES 3, 4, 5, and 6) to form the 1st Special Forces, a parent regiment under the Combat Arms Regimental System

Former 1st Ranger Infantry Battalion, 2d Infantry Battalion, and 3d, 4th, 5th, and 6th Ranger Infantry Battalions withdrawn 3 February 1986, consolidated with the 75th Infantry, and consolidated unit redesignated as the 75th Ranger Regiment (remainder of the 1st Special Forces – hereafter separate lineage)

ANNEX 2

Constituted 11 March 1943 in the Army of the United States as the 2d Ranger Battalion

Activated 1 April 1943 at Camp Forrest, Tennessee

Redesignated 1 August 1943 as the 2d Ranger Infantry Battalion

Inactivated 23 October 1945 at Camp Patrick Henry, Virginia

Redesignated 29 July 1949 as the 2d Infantry Battalion (Companies E and F concurrently disbanded)

Activated 15 September 1949 in the Canal Zone

Inactivated 4 January 1950 in the Canal Zone

After 4 January 1950 organic elements underwent changes as follows:

Company A redesignated 25 October 1950 as the 2d Ranger Infantry Company and allotted to the Regular Army; activated 28 October 1950 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 1 August 1951 in Korea

Company B redesignated 2 November 1950 as the 6th Ranger Infantry Company and allotted to the Regular Army; activated 20 November 1950 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 1 December 1951 in Germany

Company C redesignated 27 February 1951 as the 14th Ranger Infantry Company, allotted to the Regular Army, and activated at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 27 October 1951 at Camp Carson, Colorado

Company D redesignated 27 February 1951 as the 15th Ranger Infantry Company, allotted to the Regular Army, and activated at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 5 November 1951 at Fort Benning, Georgia

Company E reconstituted 15 December 1950 in the Regular Army as the 9th Ranger Infantry Company; activated 5 January 1951 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 5 November 1951 at Fort Benning, Georgia

Company F reconstituted 15 December 1950 in the Regular Army as the 10th Ranger Infantry Company; activated 5 January 1951 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 15 September 1951 in Japan

Battalion redesignated 24 November 1952 as the 2d Ranger Infantry Battalion and allotted to the Regular Army (former organic elements concurrently redesignated)

Redesignated 14 June 1955 as the 2d Infantry Battalion

Activated 1 July 1955 in Iceland

Inactivated 11 March 1960 at Fort Hamilton, New York

ANNEX 3

Constituted 21 July 1943 in the Army of the United States as the 3d Ranger Battalion; concurrently consolidated with the 3d Ranger Battalion (Provisional) (organized 21 May 1943 in North Africa) and consolidated unit designated as the 3d Ranger Battalion

Redesignated 1 August 1943 as the 3d Ranger Infantry Battalion

Disbanded 15 August 1944

After 15 August 1944 organic elements underwent changes as follows:

Company A reconstituted 25 October 1950 in the Regular Army as the 3d Ranger Infantry Company; activated 28 October 1950 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 1 August 1951 in Korea

Company B reconstituted 2 November 1950 in the Regular Army as the 7th Ranger Infantry Company; activated 20 November 1950 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 5 November 1951 at Fort Benning, Georgia

Company C reconstituted 15 December 1950 in the Regular Army as the 11th Ranger Infantry Company; activated 5 January 1951 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 21 September 1951 in Japan

Company D reconstituted 15 December 1950 in the Regular Army as the 12th Ranger Infantry Company; activated 1 February 1951 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 27 October 1951 at Camp Atterbury, Indiana

Company E reconstituted 15 December 1950 in the Regular Army as the 13th Ranger Infantry Company; activated 1 February 1951 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 15 October 1951 at Camp Pickett, Virginia

Battalion reconstituted 24 November 1952 in the Regular Army as the 3d Ranger Infantry Battalion (former organic elements concurrently redesignated)

ANNEX 4

Constituted 21 July 1943 in the Army of the United States as the 4th Ranger Battalion; concurrenly consolidated with the 4th Ranger Battalion (Provisional) (organized 29 May 1943 in North Africa) and consolidated unit designated as the 4th Ranger Battalion

Redesignated 1 August 1943 at the 4th Ranger Infantry Battalion

Disbanded 24 October 1944 at Camp Butner, North Carolina

After 24 October 1944 organic elements underwent changes as follows:

Company A reconstituted 25 October 1950 in the Regular Army as the 4th Ranger Infantry Company; activated 28 October 1950 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 1 August 1951 in Korea

Company B reconstituted 2 November 1950 in the Regular Army as the 8th Ranger Infantry Company; activated 20 November 1950 at Fort Benning, Georgia; inactivated 1 August 1951 in Korea

Battalion reconstituted 24 November 1952 in the Regular Army as the 4th Ranger Infantry Battalion (former organic elements concurrently redesignated)

ANNEX 5

Constituted 21 July 1943 in the Army of the United States as the 5th Ranger Battalion

Redesignated 1 August 1943 as the 5th Ranger Infantry Battalion

Activated 1 September 1943 at Camp Forrest, Tennessee

Inactivated 22 October 1945 at Camp Myles Standish, Massachusetts

ANNEX 6

Constituted 16 December 1940 in the Regular Army as the 98th Field Artillery Battalion

Activated 20 January 1941 at Fort Lewis, Washington

Converted and redesignated 26 September 1944 as the 6th Ranger Infantry Battalion

Inactivated 30 December 1945 in Japan


75th Ranger Regiment Honors

Campaign Participation Credit

World War II: Algeria-French Morocco (with arrowhead); Tunisia; Sicily (with arrowhead); Naples-Foggia (with arrowhead); Anzio (with arrowhead); Rome-Arno; Normandy (with arrowhead); Northern France; Rhineland; Ardennes-Alsace; Central Europe; New Guinea; Leyte (with arrowhead); Luzon; India-Burma; Central Burma

Vietnam: Advisory; Defense; Counteroffensive; Counteroffensive, Phase II; Counteroffensive, Phase III; Tet Counteroffensive; Counteroffensive, Phase IV; Counteroffensive, Phase V; Counteroffensive, Phase VI; Tet 69/Counteroffensive; Summer-Fall 1969; Winter-Spring 1970; Sanctuary Counteroffensive; Counteroffensive, Phase VII; Consolidation I; Consolidation II; Cease-Fire

Armed Forces Expeditions: Grenada (with arrowhead); Panama (with arrowhead)

Decorations

Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for EL GUETTAR

Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for SALERNO

Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for POINTE DU HOE

Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for SAAR RIVER AREA

Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for MYITKYINA

Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for VIETNAM 1966-1968

Valorous Unit Award for VIETNAM – II CORPS AREA

Valorous Unit Award for BINH DUONG PROVINCE

Valorous Unit Award for III CORPS AREA 1969

Valorous Unit Award for FISH HOOK

Valorous Unit Award for III CORPS AREA 1971

Valorous Unit Award for THUA THIEN – QUANG TRI

Valorous Unit Award for GRENADA

Valorous Unit Award for MOGADISHU

Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for VIETNAM 1968

Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for VIETNAM 1969

Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for VIETNAM 1969-1970

Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for PACIFIC AREA


1st Battalion

75th Ranger Regiment Lineage

Organized 3 October 1943 in the Army of the United States in the China-Burma-India Theater of Operations as an element of the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional)

Consolidated 10 August 1944 with Company C, 475th Infantry (constituted 25 May 1944 in the Army of the United States), and consolidated unit designated as Company C, 475th Infantry

Inactivated 1 July 1945 in China

Redesignated 21 June 1954 as Company C, 75th Infantry

Allotted 26 October 1954 to the Regular Army

Activated 20 November 1954 on Okinawa

Inactivated 21 March 1956 on Okinawa

Activated 1 February 1969 in Vietnam

Inactivated 25 October 1971 in Vietnam

Redesignated 31 January 1974 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 75th Infantry, and activated at Fort Stewart, Georgia (organic elements concurrently constituted and activated)

Headquarters and Headquarters Company consolidated 3 February 1986 with former Company A, 1st Ranger Infantry Battalion (see ANNEX); 1st Battalion, 75th Infantry, concurrently redesignated as the 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment

ANNEX

Constituted 27 May 1942 in the Army of the United States as Company A, 1st Ranger Battalion

Activated 19 June 1942 in Northern Ireland

Redesignated 1 August 1943 as Company A, 1st Ranger Infantry Battalion

Disbanded 15 August 1944

Reconstituted 1 September 1948 in the Army of the United States as Company A, 1st Infantry Battalion, and activated in the Canal Zone

Inactivated 4 January 1950 in the Canal Zone

Redesignated 25 October 1950 as the 1st Ranger Infantry Company and allotted to the Regular Army

Activated 28 October 1950 at Fort Benning, Georgia

Inactivated 1 August 1951 in Korea

Redesignated 24 November 1952 as Company A, 1st Ranger Infantry Battalion

Consolidated 15 April 1960 with the 1st Company, 1st Battalion, 1st Regiment, 1st Special Service Force (activated 9 July 1942), and consolidated unit redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 7th Special Forces Group, 1st Special Forces

Consolidated 6 June 1960 with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 77th Special Forces Group (activated 25 September 1953), and consolidated unit designated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 7th Special Forces Group, 1st Special Forces (organic elements constituted 20 May 1960 and activated 6 June 1960)

Former Company A, 1st Ranger Infantry Battalion, withdrawn 3 February 1986, consolidated with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 75th Infantry, and consolidated unit redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment (remainder of 7th Special Forces Group, 1st Special Forces – hereafter separate lineage)


1st Battalion

75th Ranger Regiment Honors

Campaign Participation Credit

World War II: *Algeria-French Morocco (with arrowhead); *Tunisia; *Sicily (with arrowhead); *Naples-Foggia (with arrowhead); *Anzio (with arrowhead); *Rome-Arno; Normandy (with arrowhead); Northern France; Rhineland; Ardennes-Alsace; Central Europe; New Guinea; Leyte (with arrowhead); Luzon; *India-Burma; *Central Burma

Korean War: *CCF Intervention; *First UN Counteroffensive; *CCF Spring Offensive; *UN Summer-Fall Offensive

Vietnam: *Counteroffensive, Phase VI; *Tet 69/Counteroffensive; *Summer-Fall 1969; *Winter-Spring 1970; *Sanctuary Counteroffensive; *Counteroffensive, Phase VII; *Consolidation I

Armed Forces Expeditions: *Grenada (with arrowhead); *Panama (with arrowhead)

Decorations

*Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for EL GUETTAR

*Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for SALERNO

Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for POINTE DU HOE

Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for SAAR RIVER AREA

*Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for MYITKYINA

*Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for CHIPYONG-NI

*Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for HONGCHON

*Valorous Unit Award for VIETNAM – II CORPS AREA

*Valorous Unit Award for GRENADA

*Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm for VIETNAM 1969-1970

*Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm for VIETNAM 1970-1971

*Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal, First Class for VIETNAM 1969-1971


2d Battalion

75th Ranger Regiment Lineage

Organized 3 October 1943 in the Army of the United States in the China-Burma-India Theater of Operations as an element of the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional)

Consolidated 10 August 1944 with Company H, 475th Infantry (constituted 25 May 1944 in the Army of the United States), and consolidated unit designated as Company H, 475th Infantry

Inactivated 1 July 1945 in China

Redesignated 21 June 1954 as Company H, 75th Infantry

Allotted 26 October 1954 to the Regular Army

Activated 20 November 1954 on Okinawa

Inactivated 21 March 1956 on Okinawa

Activated 1 February 1969 in Vietnam

Inactivated 15 August 1972 in Vietnam

Redesignated 1 October 1974 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 75th Infantry, and activated at Fort Lewis, Washington (organic elements concurrently constituted and activated)

Headquarters and Headquarters Company consolidated 3 February 1986 with former Company A, 2d Infantry Battalion (see ANNEX); 2d Battalion, 75th Infantry, concurrently redesignated as the 2d Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment

ANNEX

Constituted 11 March 1943 in the Army of the United States as Company A, 2d Ranger Battalion

Activated 1 April 1943 at Camp Forrest, Tennessee

Redesignated 1 August 1943 as Company A, 2d Ranger Infantry Battalion

Inactivated 23 October 1945 at Camp Patrick Henry, Virginia

Redesignated 29 July 1949 as Company A, 2d Infantry Battalion

Activated 15 September 1949 in the Canal Zone

Inactivated 4 January 1950 in the Canal Zone

Redesignated 25 October 1950 as the 2d Ranger Infantry Company and allotted to the Regular Army

Activated 28 October 1950 at Fort Benning, Georgia

Inactivated 1 August 1951 in Korea

Redesignated 24 November 1952 as Company A, 2d Ranger Infantry Battalion

Redesignated 14 June 1955 as Company A, 2d Infantry Battalion

Activated 1 July 1955 in Iceland

Inactivated 11 March 1960 at Fort Hamilton, New York

Consolidated 15 April 1960 with the 4th Company, 2d Battalion, 1st Regiment, 1st Special Service Force (activated 9 July 1942), and consolidated unit redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 10th Special Forces Group, 1st Special Forces

Consolidated 30 September 1960 with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 10th Special Forces Group (activated 11 June 1952), and consolidated unit designated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 10th Special Forces Group, 1st Special Forces (organic elements concurrently constituted and activated 20 March 1961)

Former Company A, 2d Infantry Battalion, withdrawn 3 February 1986, consolidated with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 75th Infantry, and consolidated unit redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment (remainder of 10th Special Forces Group, 1st Special Forces – hereafter separate lineage)
2d Battalion

75th Ranger Regiment Honors

Campaign Participation Credit

World War II: Algeria-French Morocco (with arrowhead); Tunisia; Sicily (with arrowhead); Naples-Foggia (with arrowhead); Anzio (with arrowhead); Rome-Arno; *Normandy (with arrowhead); *Northern France; *Rhineland; *Ardennes-Alsace; *Central Europe; New Guinea; Leyte (with arrowhead); Luzon; *India-Burma; *Central Burma

Korean War: *CCF Intervention; *First UN Counteroffensive (with arrowhead); *CCF Spring Offensive; *UN Summer-Fall Offensive

Vietnam: *Counteroffensive, Phase VI; *Tet 69/Counteroffensive; *Summer-Fall 1969; *Winter-Spring 1970; *Sanctuary Counteroffensive; *Counteroffensive, Phase VII; *Consolidation I; *Consolidation II; *Cease-Fire

Armed Forces Expeditions: *Grenada (with arrowhead); *Panama (with arrowhead)

Decorations

Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for EL GUETTAR

Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for SALERNO

*Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for POINTE DU HOE

Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for SAAR RIVER AREA

*Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for MYITKYINA

*Valorous Unit Award for III CORPS AREA 1969

*Valorous Unit Award for FISH HOOK

*Valorous Unit Award for III CORPS AREA 1971

*Valorous Unit Award for GRENADA

*French Croix de Guerre with Silver-Gilt Star, World War II for POINTE DU HOE

*Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm for VIETNAM 1969

*Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm for VIETNAM 1969-1970

*Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm for VIETNAM 1970-1971

*Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm for VIETNAM 1971-1972

*Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal, First Class for VIETNAM 1969-1970


3d Battalion

75th Ranger Regiment Lineage

Organized 3 October 1943 in the Army of the United States in the China-Burma-India Theater of Operations as an element of the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional)

Consolidated 10 August 1944 with Company F, 475th Infantry (constituted 25 May 1944 in the Army of the United States), and consolidated unit designated as Company F, 475th Infantry

Inactivated 1 July 1945 in China

Redesignated 21 June 1954 as Company F, 75th Infantry

Allotted 26 October 1954 to the Regular Army

Activated 20 November 1954 on Okinawa

Inactivated 21 March 1956 on Okinawa

Activated 1 February 1969 in Vietnam

Inactivated 15 March 1971 in Vietnam

Redesignated 2 October 1984 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 75th Infantry, and activated at Fort Benning, Georgia (organic elements concurrently constituted and activated)

Headquarters and Headquarters Company consolidated 3 February 1986 with former Company A, 3d Ranger Infantry Battalion (see ANNEX); 3d Battalion, 75th Infantry, concurrently redesignated as the 3d Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment

ANNEX

Constituted 21 July 1943 in the Army of the United States as Company A, 3d Ranger Battalion; concurrently consolidated with Company A, 3d Ranger Battalion (Provisional) (organized 21 May 1943 in North Africa), and consolidated unit designated as Company A, 3d Ranger Battalion

Redesignated 1 August 1943 as Company A, 3d Ranger Infantry Battalion

Disbanded 15 August 1944

Reconstituted 25 October 1950 in the Regular Army as the 3d Ranger Infantry Company

Activated 28 October at Fort Benning, Georgia

Inactivated 1 August 1951 in Korea

Redesignated 24 November 1952 as Company A, 3d Ranger Infantry Battalion

Consolidated 15 April 1960 with the 1st Company, 1st Battalion, 2d Regiment, 1st Special Service Force (activated 9 July 1942), and consolidated unit redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 13th Special Forces Group, 1st Special Forces

Withdrawn 14 December 1960 from the Regular Army and allotted to the Army Reserve (organic elements concurrently constituted)

Group activated 1 March 1961 with Headquarters at Jacksonville, Florida

Headquarters and Headquarters Company inactivated 15 April 1963 at Jacksonville, Florida (organic elements inactivated 21 January 1966)

Former Company A, 3d Ranger Infantry Battalion, withdrawn 3 February 1986, consolidated with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 75th Infantry, and consolidated unit redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment (remainder of 13th Special Forces Group, 1st Special Forces – hereafter separate lineage)


3d Battalion

75th Ranger Regiment Honors

Campaign Participation Credit

World War II: Algeria-French Morocco (with arrowhead); Tunisia; *Sicily (with arrowhead); *Naples-Foggia (with arrowhead); *Anzio (with arrowhead); *Rome-Arno; Normandy (with arrowhead); Northern France; Rhineland; Ardennes-Alsace; Central Europe; New Guinea; Leyte (with arrowhead); Luzon; *India-Burma; *Central Burma

Korean War: *First UN Counteroffensive; *CCF Spring Offensive; *UN Summer-Fall Offensive

Vietnam: *Counteroffensive, Phase VI; *Tet 69/Counteroffensive; *Summer-Fall 1969; *Winter-Spring 1970; *Sanctuary Counteroffensive; *Counteroffensive, Phase VII

Armed Forces Expeditions: *Panama (with arrowhead)

Decorations

Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for EL GUETTAR

*Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for SALERNO

Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for POINTE DU HOE

Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for SAAR RIVER AREA

*Presidential Unit Citation (Army) for MYITKYINA

*Valorous Unit Award for BINH DUONG PROVINCE

*Valorous Unit Award for MOGADISHU

*Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation for UIJONGBU CORRIDOR

*Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation for KOREA 1951

*Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm for VIETNAM 1969

*Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm for VIETNAM 1969-1970

*Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal, First Class for VIETNAM 1969-1970

The Black Beret – a brief history:

The beret is European in origin – not American.  The word “beret” is defined in the New American Heritage Dictionary as “a round, visorless cloth cap, worn originally by male Basques.  [French béret, from Old Gascon barret, cap, from Late Latin birrus (of obscure version), hooded cape.] The word beret can be traced back to the early nineteenth century and this particular type of headgear has its roots in the northern mountainous regions of Spain and southern France, the Pyrennes, in a cap called boina. The boina {Basque for beret] is a small, round woolen cap with a flattened top, and still typifies Basque peasant dress. Incidentally, the Basque region also has its own network of guerrillas, the ETA (Euskadi ta AskatasunaBasque Fatherland and Liberty) whose principal aim is to create an independent Basque state.  They are held responsible for the deaths of 800 people. The beret was introduced in Spain during the First Carlist War from 1833-39 and red identified the wearer as a Carlist (txapelgorri in Basque, that took the meaning of “Carlist soldier”) and Isabellines wore white berets. Today the Basque police force, the Ertzaintza, wears red berets.

Some of the early settlers on the American continent were of Scottish and Irish decent.  These men brought along bonnets as headgear.  Made of cloth and wide brimmed, these caps were usually blue, although some merchants sold them in various colors as well. Their origin stems as far back as the 17th century and there is evidence that bonnets were of several types – cut and sewn, knitted and woven.

One noted Ranger historian interested in preserving his era’s contribution to the beret history writes: “American Rangers did not wear Berets in colonial times. The French were the enemy.” The French, though a fashion conscious lot, probably had no impact on the headgear choices of colonial Rangers.  He further stipulates that although no headdress was standardized, Rangers who could acquire them, preferred to wear the Balmoral Bonnets – a bonnet with a round ball on top, the ball usually red.  This is of course absurd.  What woodsman would wear a brightly colored bonnet or beret?  But one thing Rangers would probably not be wearing would be colors that would alert the enemy.  Noted colonial Ranger scholar Gary S. Zaboly describes in his masterful book The Annotated and Illustrated Journals of Major Robert Rogers that:  “I recall a battle reenactment between Rangers and French forces.  The Rangers came slinking down a tree-clad hill to surprise the enemy in the flank.  Even though the trees were in full foliage, I could still make out the red poms and the light-to-middle blue bonnets plunging down the slope, and then I realized that the Rangers of the 1750s, in the field at least, would never have worn bonnets this particular shade of blue, and especially not with red poms on them.” During the colonial period Zaboly concludes Rangers wore a multitude of different headgear – from animal skins, to jockey caps and bonnets in various colors and other felt hats usually cut down to brims about two inches wide.

In 1891 the French mountain troops, Les Chasseurs Alpins, adopted an extremely large version of the beret.  The color chosen or easily found at the local merchant or supplier was dark blue.  Some time earlier French Marines had worn a normal sized dark blue beret.

With the advent of industrialization and the wholesale slaughter of infantry during the Great War, soldiers returned to the early traditions of wearing steel helmets but “it also introduced berets into the main-stream of Western military uniforms.  Nearly all sources identify the tank as the causal agent.  Its cramped and obstructive confines compelled the British Royal Tank Corps, for one, to adopt a more functional headgear than their cumbersome and easily stained khaki cap.  Officially adopted in 1924, the new British black Beret was a compromise between the ‘skimpy’ beret of the Basque peasant and the ‘sloppy’ beret of the French Chasseurs Alpins.” European armies adopted the beret universally as well as permanently.

During the Second World War, the U.S. Army’s 1st Ranger Battalion, commonly known as Darby’s Rangers, formed in Northern Ireland in 1942 and began its long association with the world renowned British Commandos.  Completion of training at the Commando Depot afforded those Rangers the right to wear the British Commando Green Beret and the tartan of the Clan Cameron of Lochiel. The U.S. Army did not authorize it and Darby’s Rangers never donned their berets.  Instead, in an effort to Americanize these specialty troops, permitted each Ranger to wear the Ranger Scroll on his left shoulder, identifying him as a member of the:  “1stRANGER Bn.”

Another similar example would be that of the maroon beret.  In 1942, the British Paratroopers began wearing the beret.  “The maroon beret was first seen by German troops in North Africa, and within months they had christened the ferocious Paras ‘Rote Teufel’ – Red Devils.  This distinctive headdress, since adopted by parachute troops all over the world, was officially introduced at the direction of General Browning, and the Pegasus symbol – Bellerophon astride winged Pegasus – became the emblem of British Airborne Forces. In 1943, General Browning granted a battalion of the U.S. Army’s 509th Parachute Infantry Regiment honorary membership in the British Parachute Regiment and authorized them to wear British maroon berets.

In 1951 and again in 1976, the U.S. Marine Corps flirted with the idea of wearing berets, blue and green in color, but decided not to adopt them.  In 1951, the 10th Airborne Ranger Company put their men in black berets, but they were only locally authorized and only worn briefly until their deployment to Korea to join the 45 Infantry Division.

In the U.S. Army, Headquarters, Department of the Army (HQDA) policy from 1973 through 1979 permitted local commanders to encourage morale-enhancing distinctions, and Armor and Armored Cavalry personnel wore black berets as distinctive headgear until Chief of Staff of the Army (CSA) Bernard W. Rogers banned all such unofficial headgear in 1979.  Other units that had worn the black beret included: Company F (LRP), 52d Infantry, 1st Infantry Division, in 1967 in the Republic of Vietnam; Company H (Ranger), 75th Infantry, 1st Cavalry Division, in 1970 in the Republic of Vietnam; and Company N  (Ranger), 75th Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade, in 1971 in the Republic of Vietnam.  A brown or olive beret was worn in Alaska by the 172d Infantry Brigade as well as members of the brigades 1/60th Infantry who wore their brown berets with light blue flash insignias.   E Troop/17th CAV wore a tan colored beret from 1965-67.

Black berets again were authorized in the 1970s for U.S. Army personnel assigned to Ranger units and for all female soldiers. The newly minted Rangers of the 1st and 2nd Battalion, 75th Infantry (airborne) received authorization to wear their black berets officially via AR 670-5, Uniform and Insignia.  The date: 30 January 1975.  The Rangers switched to tan on June 14th, 2001.

Ranger Tan Beret Statement

Fellow Rangers,

The purpose in writing this note is to inform you that the 75th Ranger Regiment will exchange our traditional Black Beret for a Tan Beret. The Army’s donning of the Black Beret, as its standard headgear is a symbol of the “Army’s on-going Transformation” and a “symbol of excellence.” The 75th Ranger Regiment fully supports our Army’s initiative to don the Black Beret.

The Tan color of the new Ranger Beret reinvigorates the historical and spiritual linkage throughout the history of the American Ranger. It is the color of the buckskin uniforms and animal skin hats of Rogers’ Rangers, the first significant Ranger unit to fight on the American continent, and the genesis of the American Ranger lineage. Tan is the one universal and unifying color that transcends all Ranger Operations. It reflects the Butternut uniforms of Mosby’s Rangers during the American Civil War. It is reminiscent of the numerous beach assaults in the European Theater and the jungle fighting in the Pacific Theaters of World War II, where Rangers and Marauders spearheaded victory. It represents the khaki uniform worn by our Korean and Vietnam War era Rangers and the color of the sand of Grenada, Panama, Iraq, and Mogadishu, where modern day Rangers lead the way as they fought and, at times, valiantly died accomplishing the Ranger mission. Tan rekindles the legacy of Rangers from all eras and exemplifies the unique skills and special capabilities required of past, present, and future Rangers.

The Ranger Tan Beret will distinguish Rangers in the 21st Century as the Black Beret recognized them as a cut above in the past. With the donning of this new Beret, rest assured that the 75th Ranger Regiment will continue to Lead the Way with its high standards.

I made this decision because I feel it is best for the Ranger Regiment and our Army, today and in the future.

Following the announcement that on 14 June 2001 the Army would adopt the Black Beret as its standard headgear I asked the Regimental Command Sergeant Major to put together a uniform committee to examine some possible uniform options for the Regiment. These options included maintaining the current Black Beret, adding distinctive insignia to the Black Beret, and adopting a different color beret (ultimately six different colors were examined). The committee I established met three times over two months to consider input from Rangers of all ranks in the Regiment. The members of this group included the Honorary Colonel of the Regiment, DCO [Deputy Commanding Officer], RSM [Regimental Sergeant-Major], CSMs [Command Sergeant-Major] of each Battalion, and 1SGs of RHHC [Regimental Headquarters and Headquarters Company] and RTD [Ranger Training Detachment].

From the initial options, the committee narrowed consideration to maintaining the current Black Beret, augmenting the Black Beret with a WWII Ranger ‘diamond’ patch attached next to the flash, and an option of replacing the Black Beret with a Tan colored beret. The committee explored each option historically giving equal consideration to its appearance when donned with each of our uniforms. After receiving input from the units, the Tan Beret was selected.

Shortly after 1st Ranger Battalion was reactivated in 1974, the Army formally authorized the Black Beret for Rangers. By so doing, I do not believe it was saying the Rangers were different from the rest of the Army, but that they were distinctive within the Army, that more was expected of them, and that they would set the standards for the rest of the Army. They would be asked to “Lead the Way” as Rangers had done since WWII.

As today’s Rangers follow in the footsteps of those who preceded them, they continue to uphold the high standards of the Regiment as they prepare for tomorrow’s battles. Changing from the Black Beret to the Tan Beret is not about being different from the rest of the Army, but about a critical aspect that unifies our Army and makes it the best Army in the world — High Standards.

One of the Rangers most visible distinctive “physical features” is the beret. In the past, the beret distinguished the Rangers and acknowledged that they are expected to maintain higher standards, move further, faster, and fight harder than any other soldiers. I believe Rangers today and in the years to come deserve that same distinction.

Rangers have never been measured by what they have worn in peace or combat, but by commitment, dedication, physical and mental toughness, and willingness to Lead the Way — Anywhere, Anytime. The Beret has become one of our most visible symbols, it will remain so.

Unity within our Army is absolutely critical to combat readiness and Rangers have always prided themselves in being part of that unity. Unity among Rangers, past and present, is essential to moving forward and ensuring we honor those who have put the combat streamers on our colors and acknowledge the sacrifices and dedication of the Rangers and their families who serve our nation today.

I hope that when our Army dons the Black Beret and our Rangers put on the Tan Beret we will move forward and focus on what is ultimately the most important task in front of us — ensuring the continued high state of Readiness of the Ranger Regiment. We can do that by training hard and taking care of our Rangers and their families. The continued support of all Rangers to our Army is important to sustaining that Readiness.

Thanks to our Army, The 75th Ranger Regiment today is fully resourced and combat ready. Our focus in the future is maintaining that high state of readiness.

Again, thanks to each of you for everything you have done for our nation and our Rangers.

Rangers Lead the Way!

P.K. Keen

Colonel, Infantry

11th Colonel of the Regiment


The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Houghton Mifflin Company: Boston, 1976, pages 124-125.
http://www.army.mil/features/beret/beret.htm
http://www.carson.army.mil/pao/media_relations/data_card.htmKushner, pages 69-70.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beret
Gary Zaboly, American Colonial Ranger, Osprey Publishing:  Oxford, 2004, page 60.
http://www.appins.org/bonnet.htm
Documented History of Ranger Headdress by Robert Black
Illustrated, page 311.
Timothy J. Todish and Gary S. Zaboly, The Annotated and Illustrated Journals of Major Robert Rogers, Purple Mountain Press:  New York, 2002. Pages 292-322.
http://www.army.mil/features/beret/beret.htm
http://www.army.mil/features/beret/beret.htm
Carl Lehman, Darby Ranger interview/email.
http://www.army.mod.uk/para/history/northafrica.htm
http://www.army.mil/features/beret/beret.htm
Gung Ho Magazine,, October 1984, The Ranger Beret by Robert Black, pages 32-33
http://www.army.mil/features/beret/beret.htm
http://www.carson.army.mil/pao/media_relations/data_card.htm
Roy Boatman interview
http://www.army.mil/features/beret/beret.htm


The New Flash for the 75th Ranger Regiment
(U.S. Army 18 May 2001)

Regimental Flash

A shield-shaped embroidered device with semi-circular base, 2 1/4 inches (5.72cm) in height and 1 7/8 inches (4.76cm) in width overall, edged with a 1/8 inch (.32cm) black border; an inner black border notched scarlet at the horizontal center line, four diagonal lines, upper scarlet, khaki, orange and lower white from upper right to lower left dividing the shield approximately in half. The upper left being green and the lower right being ultramarine blue.

1st Battalion

2d Battalion

3d Battalion

1st Battalion: A shield-shaped embroidered device with semi-circular base, 2 1/4 inches (5.72cm) in height and 1 7/8 inches (4.76cm) in width overall, edged with a 1/8 inch (.32cm) black border; an inner black border notched scarlet at the horizontal center line, four diagonal lines, upper scarlet, khaki, orange and lower white from upper right to lower left dividing the shield approximately in half. The upper left being green and the lower right being ultramarine blue.

2d Battalion: A shield-shaped embroidered device with semi-circular base, 2 1/4 inches (5.72cm) in height and 1 7/8 inches (4.76cm) in width overall, edged with a 1/8 inch (.32cm) black border; an inner black border double notched scarlet at the horizontal center line, four diagonal lines, upper scarlet, khaki, orange and lower white from upper right to lower left dividing the shield approximately in half. The upper left being green and the lower right being ultramarine blue.

3d Battalion: A shield-shaped embroidered device with semi-circular base, 2 1/4 inches (5.72cm) in height and 1 7/8 inches (4.76cm) in width overall, edged with a 1/8 inch (.32cm) black border; an inner black border triple notched scarlet at the horizontal center line, four diagonal lines, upper scarlet, khaki, orange and lower white from upper right to lower left dividing the shield approximately in half. The upper left being green and the lower right being ultramarine blue.